The question of when we will be gathering together again has been the subject of much prayer and discussion by our church’s leadership. We are asking God for wisdom as we attempt to follow the guidelines of New York State and New York City regarding the timing for reopening our church campus. At the same time, we are making plans and putting protocols in place to ensure your safety and well-being when we are able to meet again. Stay tuned for updates as more information becomes available.  

In the meantime, we hope that you will continue to join us for Tuesday Prayer Onlinebeginning at 7pm; Sunday Worship Online, beginning at 9am; and weekday Devotions Onlinebeginning at 10am. We also invite you to check the Churchwide Announcements on our home page to learn about additional online events for each member of your family.

Shalom

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

“Commit your way to the Lord; trust in him and he will do this…” (Psalm 37:5 NIV)

In Hebrew, the word for peace is shalom, which encompasses more than just an absence of conflict.  Shalom in the Hebrew also means happiness, well-being, prosperity and blessing.  

In Psalm 37, we find three keys to a life of shalom.  The first is to trust and have faith in God—to live a life of leaning on God.  All of us are leaning on something or someone today.  It could be friends or family, a bank account, our education, our jobs.  Thank God for people and thank God for our jobs.  But we can’t lean on these things; for if we were to lose our job, for example, what would happen to our peace?  When we lean on the Lord, however, we can never lose our peace because the Lord is immovable; he will not falter or give way.

One of the proofs that we’re really trusting and leaning on God is when we take our minds off what we may be going through, and we do good.  That’s the second key to peace.  We can help someone cross the street; give a glass of water in Jesus’ name; hug someone; think of someone we can call and bless.  By concentrating on others, we lift ourselves out of the quagmire we may be in.  If we just sit there, however, our minds gravitate toward the things that are pulling us down, for we too easily think on negative things rather than the positive promises of God.

The third key to experiencing a life of shalom is to commit our way to him; and that’s the hardest.  We may have an essential trust in God and do good, but then things happen in life:  people do and say things; the enemy comes to remind us of a sin we may have committed in the past—a sin for which Jesus already paid the price.  And we can end up wounded and brokenhearted.  Implicit in the phrase, “commit your way to the Lord,” is the encouragement to “roll your care on him.”  

Do you have some problem today that is undermining the shalom of God in your life and getting you down? God will help you.  Just cry out to him and say, “Lord, this thing is too big for me; this guilt is consuming me; this brokenness of heart is going to crush me!  I want not only to trust you and do good, but also to roll this thing upon you so that I will have your peace—your shalom.”  He will hear your cry.

Read Psalm 37:1-9.

The Prayer Center